Open events
Event #1101

Our Land Beautiful: An Evening with Nettie Wild

When: 

Monday, June 3, 2019

17:00 - 21:30
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Where:
Frederic Wood Theatre - FRWO 102 THEATRE
Series:
UBC performances
Language: 
English | anglais
This open event is hosted by

Our Land Beautiful, a multi-stage event, engages with the work of acclaimed BC filmmaker Nettie Wild. The main event of the evening will be a screening of Konelīne: Our Land Beautiful (2016) with an introduction by the filmmakers and followed by a Q&A. Before the main event, a roundtable discussion with UBC researchers and prominent members of Vancouver’s film industry will address questions such as: What is the role of art in environmentalism? How does Wild’s work negotiate tensions between economic and environmental concerns, as well as the impacts of these conflicts on Indigenous communities? A reception co-sponsored by UBC Arts Alumni Engagement and the Department of Theatre and Film will follow.

 

Schedule of events

5.00pm - 6.00pm Roundtable discussion

6.00pm – 6.30pm Coffee break

6.30pm Introduction with Nettie Wild (Director) and Betsy Carson (Producer) of Canada Wild Productions

6.45pm Screening of Konelīne: Our Land Beautiful (2016) followed by Q&A with Betsy and Nettie

8:45pm – 9:30pm Reception

 

Speakers:

  • Nettie Wild, Director
  • Betsy Carson, Producer

 

In Attendance: 

  • Shaun Inouye, Programming Associate at The Cinematheque, Vancouver, MA Film Studies UBC. The Cinematheque has long celebrated Wild’s work, and in 2009 released a book called Wild at Heart: The Films of Nettie Wild.  
  • Shannon Walsh, Associate Professor in Film Production at UBC. Dr. Walsh is an award-winning documentary filmmaker and interdisciplinary theorist. She has published extensively on issues such as social movements and critical race theory.
  • Greg Coyes A graduate of Yale University, Greg is currently teaching, and coordinating the Independent Indigenous Digital Filmmaking program at Capilano University in North Vancouver. His 2018 Masters thesis focused on the SLOW MEDIA Community, which creates and promotes decolonized media, and an Indigenous sense of cinema. Greg is Metis/Cree from St. Albert, Alberta.
  • Chelsea Birks, Sessional Instructor in Film Studies at UBC, Birks’s research focuses on global cinema and the environment, and she was the winner of the 2017 SCMS Student Essay Award. She has written extensively about Nettie Wild’s recent environmentalist films
Speakers:
  • Nettie Wild, Director
  • Betsy Carson, Producer